How to Set & Hit

District-Wide Professional Development Goals

 

How to Set & Hit

District-Wide Professional Development Goals

 

Tying School District Goals to Professional Development


Put Your District's Professional Development to Work for Teachers and Students


Professional development for teachers is something that’s required in every state and school district. Traditionally, PD has been provided in the form of in-person sessions. Teachers have a professional development day or two set aside for learning and have a limited time to get to the training sessions they need support in. 

Another alternative is traveling to a conference or out of town training. Travel time can add to teachers’ burdens because they must find substitute teachers – who are in short supply – and spend time out of the classroom on professional development that may not even be relevant to their time in the classroom. We have found that after two years of classroom disruption due to COVID-19, teachers want to be in the classroom and may resent any PD requirement that takes them away from their students.

The solution is for school districts to refocus on professional development by utilizing a dynamic, teacher-driven platform where educators can expand their knowledge, increase their impact in the classroom, and improve student outcomes.

At the same time, they must learn how to identify, set, and hit district-wide professional development goals that tie into district initiatives and goals for their individual, choice-driven learning journey. Examples include technology rollouts, new curricula and standards, as well as initiatives to reduce teacher turnover and improve student outcomes.

 

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Why is K-12 Professional Development Important?

Why is K-12 Professional Development Important?

Teacher professional development keeps teachers engaged with their work and their students. After all, the best teachers are also perpetual learners.

Just as importantly, professional development for teachers makes a difference in teacher job satisfaction and teacher retention. These numbers illustrate the importance of professional development for teachers at every level:

> 8% of all teachers leave their school district every year, and an additional 8% leave the profession entirely.

> For Title I schools, the turnover rate may be up to 50%.

> Lack of proper training may increase turnover among new and inexperienced teachers. They are 25% more likely to quit than teachers who receive adequate training.

> Fewer new teachers are entering the profession each year.

Teacher professional development provides educators with the training they need to adapt to their students’ needs and give them the support and guidance they require.

What are the Benefits of Professional Development for Teachers?


Professional development for teachers benefits everybody in the educational system. School and district leadership benefit from higher teacher engagement and achievement of district goals. Students benefit because teachers are engaged and enthusiastic about their work, which leads to better student outcomes. Parents benefit because their kids benefit.

Some of the most important benefits of teacher professional development impact teachers and the people surrounding them. Let’s review a few of those benefits.

PD sets teachers up for success in the classroom.


A well-designed system of professional development provides teachers with the tools and knowledge they need to succeed in the classroom.

Educational theories evolve constantly. Teachers who stay abreast of new developments and changes are informed about what can help them connect with their students and how to use their skills to improve student outcomes. Without professional development, teachers may stagnate in the classroom but with it, students and teachers thrive.

PD increases teacher job satisfaction and improves retention.


The average urban school district may spend up to $16,000 to acquire a new teacher when one leaves a job or leaves the profession entirely. It’s far less expensive to provide teachers with the training and support they need via professional development. Alludo, for example, can be as low as $36 per teacher or adult learner per year!

The best option is to use a learner-centered model to give teachers a voice and a choice in what they learn. When teachers have input into professional development, they’re less likely to leave their jobs. High teacher satisfaction means that teachers will be engaged and enthusiastic about their jobs. Lower turnover rates help school districts save money.

PD helps teachers adapt to the changing needs of students.


Students’ needs can change at any time. Life changes may impact a student’s ability to focus or may lead to them requiring extra attention. The COVID-19 pandemic was a prime example of a circumstance that led to students requiring additional help and guidance as they adjusted to distance learning.

Teacher professional development provides educators with the training they need to adapt to their students’ needs and give them the support and guidance they require. It can also help them be responsive to kids’ emotional needs if they receive training in Social Emotional Learning.

PD helps teachers cultivate better learning outcomes for students.


Professional development improves teaching in a variety of ways, including improving student outcomes.

Students with teachers who have participated in effective professional learning receive higher grades and perform better on standardized tests. These outcomes also contribute to lower dropout rates and higher college enrollment, but the benefits go far beyond the classroom. We have found that students whose teachers engage in meaningful PD are more engaged, more confident, and more likely to be impactful in their communities.

Teacher Happiness Report

How Does Professional Development Improve Teaching?


Robust professional development improves teaching in several key ways:

How Does Professional Development Improve Teaching?


Robust professional development improves teaching in several key ways:

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Improvement #1: Increased collaboration and community among teaching staff.


Professional development provides teachers with a shared experience that encourages community building and collaboration. Since peer support is essential in any profession, PD can improve teacher support and make them feel they are part of something bigger than themselves.

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Improvement #2: Prevents teacher burnout and improves job engagement.


Teachers who don’t receive proper support are far more likely to burn out than those who do. Professional learning provides necessary training and ongoing support to help teachers improve in their jobs.

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Improvement #3: New skills and knowledge translate into improved student understanding.


Professional development gives teachers the opportunity to acquire new skills and knowledge about everything from technology to new teaching strategies and methods to connect with students.

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Improvement #1: Increased collaboration and community among teaching staff.


Professional development provides teachers with a shared experience that encourages community building and collaboration. Since peer support is essential in any profession, PD can improve teacher support and make them feel they are part of something bigger than themselves.

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Improvement #2: Prevents teacher burnout and improves job engagement.


Teachers who don’t receive proper support are far more likely to burn out than those who do. Professional learning provides necessary training and ongoing support to help teachers improve in their jobs.

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Improvement #3: New skills and knowledge translate into improved student understanding.


Professional development gives teachers the opportunity to acquire new skills and knowledge about everything from technology to new teaching strategies and methods to connect with students.

How Do We Communicate the Importance of Professional Development for Teachers?


One critical aspect of engagement is ensuring that teachers have a choice in what they learn. When PD is relevant to teachers’ unique needs, they are most likely to be (and stay) engaged. Here are some ways to ensure teachers understand why PD is essential.

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All communication related to professional development should be clear. Teachers should always know what is expected of them both in terms of requirements and goals. Communication may be one-on-one or in groups, but either is fine provided that teachers understand.

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Teachers are most likely to be engaged in professional development if they know that the work expected of them is relevant to their time in the classroom and tied to student outcomes. The best way to accomplish this goal is to communicate with teachers about what they want.

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Traditional PD is often not fun or interactive. Newer models such as the ones we design at Alludo put professional development online. We use short learning snippets called microlearning activities with gamification and friendly competition to get teachers engaged and provide rewards to ensure that they enjoy the time spent in professional learning.

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All communication related to professional development should be clear. Teachers should always know what is expected of them both in terms of requirements and goals. Communication may be one-on-one or in groups, but either is fine provided that teachers understand.

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Teachers are most likely to be engaged in professional development if they know that the work expected of them is relevant to their time in the classroom and tied to student outcomes. The best way to accomplish this goal is to communicate with teachers about what they want.

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Traditional PD is often not fun or interactive. Newer models such as the ones we design at Alludo put professional development online. We use short learning snippets called microlearning activities with gamification and friendly competition to get teachers engaged and provide rewards to ensure that they enjoy the time spent in professional learning.

What Are the Top Areas of Professional Growth & Training for Teachers?

 

Professional development can do a great deal to improve teachers’ performance and engagement with students. The key is focusing on the top areas of professional growth and training for the best results.

While teachers’ needs may be individual, it’s incumbent on school districts to take a broad view of what’s needed. Major goals and priorities can be your guide in shaping your professional development for the district as a whole and can also assist teachers in setting individual goals.

What Are the Top Areas of Professional Growth & Training for Teachers?

 

Professional development can do a great deal to improve teachers’ performance and engagement with students. The key is focusing on the top areas of professional growth and training for the best results.

While teachers’ needs may be individual, it’s incumbent on school districts to take a broad view of what’s needed. Major goals and priorities can be your guide in shaping your professional development for the district as a whole and can also assist teachers in setting individual goals.

A well-designed and teacher-driven PD plan will allow teachers to set individual goals that are relevant to their needs and their time in the classroom.

How Do You Create a Teacher-Driven PD Program?


Teacher-driven professional development is learner-centered and takes teachers’ needs and wants into consideration. Here are some ways to create a teacher-driven program for your school district:

Jurupa Case Study

Why Should Districts Assess Their Professional Development Program?


Professional development can only be successful if there is a system of ongoing assessment and evaluation of its effectiveness. When PD works, then you should be able to measure the progress of individual teachers toward individual goals as well as overall progress toward school district goals and initiatives.

Assessment should be built into your PD system to minimize the risk of human error and to make tracking easy.

Why Should We Measure the Effectiveness of District-Wide Professional Learning Strategies?


If you want your district’s professional development to be effective, you must measure it in several key areas to ensure that you’re getting the results you want. Here are four key reasons to measure the effectiveness of your district-wide professional learning.

Why Should Districts Assess Their Professional Development Program?


Professional development can only be successful if there is a system of ongoing assessment and evaluation of its effectiveness. When PD works, then you should be able to measure the progress of individual teachers toward individual goals as well as overall progress toward school district goals and initiatives.

Assessment should be built into your PD system to minimize the risk of human error and to make tracking easy.

Why Should We Measure the Effectiveness of District-Wide Professional Learning Strategies?


If you want your district’s professional development to be effective, you must measure it in several key areas to ensure that you’re getting the results you want. Here are four key reasons to measure the effectiveness of your district-wide professional learning.

Reason #1: Evaluate teacher participation and engagement.


PD is effective only if teachers participate in it and are engaged in what they’re learning. Teacher engagement translates to better performance in the classroom, improved student engagement, and most importantly, better student outcomes.

One of the metrics we provide at Alludo measures teacher engagement and the districts who have partnered with us typically experience significant increases in engagement with PD. (Districts using Alludo average 70-100% engagement!)

Reason #2: Identify areas for improvement.


We always recommend giving teachers a voice and a choice in what they learn. The voice part of the equation should include the opportunity for teachers to identify the topics for PD that will help them improve as teachers, doing a better job of understanding and connecting with their students.

Once these areas have been identified, it becomes easy to track your progress and measure improvement. Tracking should be as unique as your school district, allowing you to use your metrics to measure your progress toward your goals and initiatives related to the areas of improvement you have identified.

Reason #1: Evaluate teacher participation and engagement.


PD is effective only if teachers participate in it and are engaged in what they’re learning. Teacher engagement translates to better performance in the classroom, improved student engagement, and most importantly, better student outcomes.

One of the metrics we provide at Alludo measures teacher engagement and the districts who have partnered with us typically experience significant increases in engagement with PD. (Districts using Alludo average 70-100% engagement!)

Reason #2: Identify areas for improvement.


We always recommend giving teachers a voice and a choice in what they learn. The voice part of the equation should include the opportunity for teachers to identify the topics for PD that will help them improve as teachers, doing a better job of understanding and connecting with their students.

Once these areas have been identified, it becomes easy to track your progress and measure improvement. Tracking should be as unique as your school district, allowing you to use your metrics to measure your progress toward your goals and initiatives related to the areas of improvement you have identified.

Reason #3: Calculate ROI and allocate resources.


Any school district that wishes to improve professional development must take stewardship of resources seriously. One way to accomplish that goal is to do a good job of allocating resources and calculating the return on investment of any money spent. Ongoing tracking allows districts to assess the allocation of resources as they identify what’s working and what isn’t.

No school district has unlimited resources, so it’s always smart to determine where your money will be most useful as it relates to teacher performance, teacher engagement, and student outcomes.

Reason #4: Measure student outcomes.


All teachers want the best possible outcomes for their students. It can sometimes be challenging to tie professional development to student achievement, but when a school district introduces a new PD system, measuring student outcomes can be an important part of measuring the success of the professional development itself.

For example, if you implement online professional learning through Alludo, you should be able to see student outcomes like increased student engagement trend upwards as teacher engagement increases. While these aren’t the only areas where student outcomes may improve, an overall positive trend of better grades and better scores on standardized tests is a good sign that your PD system is doing what it should do.

Reason #3: Calculate ROI and allocate resources.


Any school district that wishes to improve professional development must take stewardship of resources seriously. One way to accomplish that goal is to do a good job of allocating resources and calculating the return on investment of any money spent. Ongoing tracking allows districts to assess the allocation of resources as they identify what’s working and what isn’t.

No school district has unlimited resources, so it’s always smart to determine where your money will be most useful as it relates to teacher performance, teacher engagement, and student outcomes.

Reason #4: Measure student outcomes.


All teachers want the best possible outcomes for their students. It can sometimes be challenging to tie professional development to student achievement, but when a school district introduces a new PD system, measuring student outcomes can be an important part of measuring the success of the professional development itself.

For example, if you implement online professional learning through Alludo, you should be able to see student outcomes like increased student engagement trend upwards as teacher engagement increases. While these aren’t the only areas where student outcomes may improve, an overall positive trend of better grades and better scores on standardized tests is a good sign that your PD system is doing what it should do.

How Do We Measure the Impact of Professional Development for Teachers?


There is a need to track the results of ongoing professional development to measure its effectiveness both in terms of teachers’ skill and enthusiasm and in students’ achievement. 

At Alludo, we provide built-in metrics as part of our professional learning platform. We also recommend that school districts track additional metrics that measure the impact of professional development on students and school district initiatives.


What are Good Professional Development Goals and Objectives?


AL_PillarPage-5Setting relevant and realistic goals is an essential part of measuring the impact of professional development. Goals should be a part of planning at every level from the assistant superintendent to the principal and other school administrators, to teachers. Every participant in the school system needs goals, and they should be linked to student achievement and outcomes.

SMART Goals

The best goals to set for measuring the impact of teacher professional development are SMART goals. An example of a SMART goal on the district level would be to achieve 90% teacher engagement within three months of launching a new professional learning environment. The goal is SMART because it includes the following things:

Specific

The goal is defined with a clear objective.

Measurable

The goal specifies the desired outcome and is measurable with Alludo’s built-in metrics.

Achievable

The goal is achievable because online asynchronous learning is accessible and convenient for teachers, making engagement less of a burden than it would be with traditional PD.

Time-Bound

The goal is time-bound because it has a specific end-date of three months from the launch of the new PD system.

Setting SMART goals is the best way to measure teacher, school, and district progress while also monitoring the impact on students.

Example #1: Learn new teaching techniques and theories.


The profession of teaching changes constantly and teachers can benefit from learning new teaching techniques and theories. The five theories of modern learning include: behaviorism, cognitivism, connectivism, constructivism, and humanism.

Goals related to new teaching techniques should be chosen with an eye toward district goals and initiatives as well as teacher choice. For example, a new technology initiative might be tied to the study of connectivism because there is some research indicating that connectivism might help to explain how technology affects the brains of both teachers and their students.

Example #2: Learn two new ways to improve student reading comprehension scores.


Student reading comprehension scores are part of standardized testing and play an important role in meeting district goals. An example of a SMART goal related to student reading comprehension scores might be to require teachers to learn two new ways to positively impact and improve students’ scores.

You can still allow teachers a choice in which professional development learning activities they think will be most helpful. Specific goals might include completing coursework related to two reading comprehension teaching methods, classroom time implementing what they learn, and a final measurement of students’ results.

Example #3: Master classroom technology.


Another example of a good professional development goal category is to master classroom technology. During the COVID-19 pandemic, classroom technology was crucial as teachers and students adapted to distance learning. Many school districts required teachers to use Zoom and other conferencing apps to connect with students as they studied from home.

You can turn mastering classroom technology into a SMART goal by specifying which technology teachers must learn, giving them a timeframe to complete professional development, and relating it to their time in the classroom by requiring them to teach their students how to use it and ask them to complete an assignment with the assistance of the technology.

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How Does Professional Development Impact Student Engagement?

 

Student engagement can be an elusive thing even for the best and most experienced teachers. That includes both students’ self-reported engagement as well as teachers’ perception of student engagement and motivation.

A report in Learning Sciences revealed the profound impact that the COVID-19 pandemic had on student engagement. Fifty percent of students reported feeling less motivation and lower morale than they had before the pandemic, while teachers reported that up to 87% of their students did not seem motivated in school.

While unexpected events like a pandemic can impact student engagement, it’s important to note that professional development can impact student engagement for the better at any time. The key is choosing measurable professional development goals that link to district goals and initiatives in a learning platform that engages students and teachers.

How Does Professional Development Impact Student Engagement?

 

Student engagement can be an elusive thing even for the best and most experienced teachers. That includes both students’ self-reported engagement as well as teachers’ perception of student engagement and motivation.

A report in Learning Sciences revealed the profound impact that the COVID-19 pandemic had on student engagement. Fifty percent of students reported feeling less motivation and lower morale than they had before the pandemic, while teachers reported that up to 87% of their students did not seem motivated in school.

While unexpected events like a pandemic can impact student engagement, it’s important to note that professional development can impact student engagement for the better at any time. The key is choosing measurable professional development goals that link to district goals and initiatives in a learning platform that engages students and teachers.

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Focusing professional development on student engagement improves outcomes.

Professional development can cover a wide array of topics. When it is focused on increasing student engagement, the results are clear. A 2019 Gallup survey found that improving and increasing student engagement led directly to better student outcomes and higher grades.

Most importantly, students who are engaged are less likely to become discouraged when they struggle with schoolwork and more likely to persist in their studies. Given how many students struggled during COVID-19 and distance learning, this is a benefit of professional development that no school district can afford to ignore.

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Different classroom management techniques can improve student engagement.

It is difficult for teachers to keep students engaged and excited about what they’re learning when they lack the training, tools, and assistance they need to manage their classrooms properly.  Professional development can help teachers by educating them not only in curricula, pedagogy, and instructional tools, but also about classroom management techniques.

The important thing for school districts to remember is that training in the form of professional development is not enough. Teachers also need access to useful technology, help from teachers’ aides, and systems that can help them manage heavy workloads more efficiently.

Different classroom management techniques can improve student engagement.

It is difficult for teachers to keep students engaged and excited about what they’re learning when they lack the training, tools, and assistance they need to manage their classrooms properly.  Professional development can help teachers by educating them not only in curricula, pedagogy, and instructional tools, but also about classroom management techniques.

The important thing for school districts to remember is that training in the form of professional development is not enough. Teachers also need access to useful technology, help from teachers’ aides, and systems that can help them manage heavy workloads more efficiently.

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How Do We Evaluate Professional Development in Education


Professional development in education is required on both state and district levels but it is effective only when it is helping school districts progress initiatives and meet goals and when it is making teachers more effective and impactful in the classroom. If student outcomes aren’t improving, it’s a sign that a district’s PD program may not be doing its job.

Evaluating professional development is the best way to measure its effectiveness and ensure that everyone’s needs – including school districts, administrators, teachers, and students – are being met.

Tracking when and how teachers use what they learn in PD is the best way to determine whether professional development is effective – and if it isn’t, to adapt it.

There are three key reasons why evaluation is essential for any district looking to increase the impact of professional development:

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Tracking ensures that everyone is making progress toward district and individual goals.


Goals must be measurable. If you don’t measure them, then there’s a chance they’ll get overlooked and remain unmet.

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It determines how engaged and enthusiastic teachers are about professional development.

Teacher engagement is one of the first metrics we build into the Alludo platform because we recognize that PD is effective only when teachers are fully committed to it and engaged by it.

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It gives school districts the data they need to revamp or adapt professional development.


Metrics such as teacher engagement, lessons completed, and student test scores are what allow districts to track the overall effectiveness of PD and make changes as needed.

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Tracking ensures that everyone is making progress toward district and individual goals.


Goals must be measurable. If you don’t measure them, then there’s a chance they’ll get overlooked and remain unmet.

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It determines how engaged and enthusiastic teachers are about professional development.

Teacher engagement is one of the first metrics we build into the Alludo platform because we recognize that PD is effective only when teachers are fully committed to it and engaged by it.

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It gives school districts the data they need to revamp or adapt professional development.


Metrics such as teacher engagement, lessons completed, and student test scores are what allow districts to track the overall effectiveness of PD and make changes as needed.

Once we understand that tracking is necessary, the next question is how to track and evaluate the effectiveness of PD. It all starts with choosing the right metrics.

Alludo Deep Dive: Learn how to make data-driven decisions with our PD platform >

Once we understand that tracking is necessary, the next question is how to track and evaluate the effectiveness of PD. It all starts with choosing the right metrics.

Alludo Deep Dive: Learn how to make data-driven decisions with our PD platform >

What Metrics Track K-12 Professional Development Training Effectiveness?


Tracking metrics related to teacher professional development is a must because school districts can use the data they collect to monitor the results of PD and improve it where it’s not working the way it should as well as scaling the things that are delivering the desired results. Key metrics to track are related to everything from participation to effectiveness and it’s important to include a mix of both.

How Do We Gather Evidence of Learning in Professional Development for Education?


Gathering evidence of learning in professional development may sometimes be automatic, as it is with the metrics that are included in the Alludo platform. However, automation is not always possible since some of the evidence needed to evaluate PD is not quantifiable in a traditional sense.

There are three methods that school districts can use to measure the effectiveness of professional development: direct evidence, indirect evidence, and supporting evidence.

Method #1: Direct Evidence

Direct evidence is the first and easiest type of evidence to collect because it can be automated. There are four methods that school districts can use to measure the effectiveness of professional development:

Compliance with state and district requirements


Compliance is simple to track because all you need is a tool like Alludo that monitors teachers’ participation in PD and tracks their progress toward district and state goals. We make it easy to track teacher participation in any modules of PD that are required and then tie their participation back to mandates.

Number of hours spent on professional development


Some teachers may complete required units of professional development quickly, so tracking the time they spend is not necessarily an indicator of compliance. However, it can be a useful way to monitor enthusiasm and engagement. Teachers who are excited about what they learn and finding it relevant to their work are likely to spend more time on PD than those who are just going through the motions.

Units of professional development completed


The number of units of PD teachers complete is as useful a measurement of engagement and enthusiasm as the number of hours they spend. Teachers who find PD materials useful are likely to pursue additional courses. They’re also more likely to retain what they learn when they do more than the minimum required of them. Redlands USD is an example: 90% of the district’s teachers surpassed their learning goals with Alludo.

Analysis of professional development coursework and assignments


Teachers who successfully complete professional learning related activities or effectively engage in collaborative PD sessions are clearly learning and are more likely to bring what they learn back to the classroom.

Compliance with state and district requirements


Compliance is simple to track because all you need is a tool like Alludo that monitors teachers’ participation in PD and tracks their progress toward district and state goals. We make it easy to track teacher participation in any modules of PD that are required and then tie their participation back to mandates.

Number of hours spent on professional development


Some teachers may complete required units of professional development quickly, so tracking the time they spend is not necessarily an indicator of compliance. However, it can be a useful way to monitor enthusiasm and engagement. Teachers who are excited about what they learn and finding it relevant to their work are likely to spend more time on PD than those who are just going through the motions.

Units of professional development completed


The number of units of PD teachers complete is as useful a measurement of engagement and enthusiasm as the number of hours they spend. Teachers who find PD materials useful are likely to pursue additional courses. They’re also more likely to retain what they learn when they do more than the minimum required of them. Redlands USD is an example: 90% of the district’s teachers surpassed their learning goals with Alludo.

Analysis of professional development coursework and assignments


Teachers who successfully complete professional learning related activities or effectively engage in collaborative PD sessions are clearly learning and are more likely to bring what they learn back to the classroom.

Using a system like Alludo’s, which has built-in metrics for school districts to collect direct evidence of learning, takes the guesswork out of tracking PD results.

Method #2: Indirect Evidence


Gathering direct evidence is the first step in measuring the effectiveness of professional development. The next step involves understanding how to gather evidence that’s not numerical but indirectly points to the effectiveness (or lack thereof) of professional development. Here are three methods to try:

  1. Surveys. Creating teacher surveys is a reliable way to get anonymous feedback from teachers in your district. You can send surveys after teachers have completed required modules to determine whether the lessons are effective. You can ask questions about relevance, teaching methods, materials, and whether teachers have used what they learned to engage their students.

  2. Teacher self-evaluation. Self-evaluation is necessary because it encourages teachers to communicate their feelings about professional development. Teachers can report whether they enjoyed PD, how useful they felt it was, and how well they retained and used the things they learned.

  3. Focus groups. Teacher focus groups can add additional breadth to teacher self-evaluations and surveys by allowing teachers to share their thoughts and experiences in a group setting with their peers. Some participants may find it helpful to hear what others think and some may be more willing to be honest in a group setting.

Indirect evidence should be used in conjunction with direct evidence to better understand the impact of professional development on teachers.

Method #3: Supporting Evidence


Supporting evidence of professional learning is evidence that ties to the effects of professional learning instead of to the learning itself. Here are three examples of supporting evidence:

  1. Student learning and outcomes. Student achievement and outcomes are priorities for every teacher and administrator. Measuring student test scores or GPAs before and after professional learning can help you determine its effectiveness.

  2. Classroom observation. Classroom observation is essential because it allows administrators and school districts to track teachers’ use of what they learned in the classroom and how it may be impacting student engagement and learning.

  3. Teacher turnover. Teachers are switching jobs and leaving the profession in record numbers. Research shows that teachers who are engaged and excited about professional development are less likely to experience burnout and dissatisfaction and therefore more likely to stay in their jobs.

By using a combination of direct, indirect, and supporting evidence to monitor the effectiveness of teacher professional development, school districts can improve student outcomes, reduce teacher turnover, meet goals, and succeed in district initiatives.

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Conclusion


Teacher professional development plays an essential role in improving education for everybody involved, including parents, students, teachers, support staff, and administrators. It’s not enough to meet state and district requirements. In its ideal form, professional learning has the potential to do the following things:

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> Engage teachers with their work and keep them enthusiastic about their profession.

> Ensure that school districts (and individual teachers) meet their growth and development goals.

> Promote the success of district initiatives, including the introduction of new technology into the classroom.

> Reduce teacher burnout and teacher turnover, thus saving school districts time and money and increasing students’ likelihood of success.

> Increase teacher engagement with parents, allowing them to communicate about students’ challenges and triumphs.

> Improve student engagement both in the classroom and with their schoolwork.

> Improve student outcomes, including standardized test scores, GPAs, graduation rates, and college acceptance rates.

The Alludo platform uses a learner-centered approach to give teachers a choice and a voice in what they learn. With built-in metrics and gamification to reward teacher participation, the results are undeniable. School districts are experiencing record levels of teacher engagement, reduced teacher turnover, and improved student outcomes.

Ready to be one of them? Request a demo of our PD platform today.

Conclusion


Teacher professional development plays an essential role in improving education for everybody involved, including parents, students, teachers, support staff, and administrators. It’s not enough to meet state and district requirements. In its ideal form, professional learning has the potential to do the following things:

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> Engage teachers with their work and keep them enthusiastic about their profession.

> Ensure that school districts (and individual teachers) meet their growth and development goals.

> Promote the success of district initiatives, including the introduction of new technology into the classroom.

> Reduce teacher burnout and teacher turnover, thus saving school districts time and money and increasing students’ likelihood of success.

> Increase teacher engagement with parents, allowing them to communicate about students’ challenges and triumphs.

> Improve student engagement both in the classroom and with their schoolwork.

> Improve student outcomes, including standardized test scores, GPAs, graduation rates, and college acceptance rates.

The Alludo platform uses a learner-centered approach to give teachers a choice and a voice in what they learn. With built-in metrics and gamification to reward teacher participation, the results are undeniable. School districts are experiencing record levels of teacher engagement, reduced teacher turnover, and improved student outcomes.

Ready to be one of them? Request a demo of our PD platform today.